What We Do

 

We are specialized in turbans and head wraps, their history and the connections between aesthetics, politics and art. Our research is focused on the Afro-Diasporic culture, and we connect the social function of turbans’ non-verbal communication, its innumerable forms of use and meanings in different cultural contexts; and its place in political activism. We are focused on bring beauty to empower, play with prints and shapes, register a legagy and fight against racism. We love to travel, to inspire and be inspired by people. We've bringing the project to a wide range of festivals, conferences, street parties and unique events in cities around the world (including Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Salvador, London, Amsterdam, Paris, Brussels, Madrid, Barcelona and Dublin). Here are a few of the work we've done.

 
 

Street Performance

 

RIO DE CONTAS: A sign saying I MAKE TURBANS, loads of printed scarves, mirrors, and short conversations about what is that, what the person do. After all a smile looking at the mirror, and maybe a reconnection.

 PHOTOS: SHAIANDRADE.TUMBLR.COM

PHOTOS: SHAIANDRADE.TUMBLR.COM

 

Workshops

 

Incorporating the historical and multicultural context, the workshop begins by emphasizing the chronology of turbans and their principal significations in different cultures around the world, with a principal focus on Afro-Brazilian culture. With scarves in hand, investing in the practical method of DIY, various methods of wrapping and binding are taught in a fluid and friendly class, which reveres beauty and diversity, carrying with it above all, the vision that positions the turban as an icon of black culture and as a crown of African queens and their diaspora.

 
 

Urban Intervention

TRAFFIC OF INFLUENCE: Serie of work in progress to re-signify the personality of statues and public monuments around the world to recreate dormant memories, telling stories and customs of important people that had been forgotten or has never heard about.

>DUBLIN Ganhadeiras X Molly Malone Were called "Ganhadeiras" black women (enslaved or already free) that circulating offering delicacies in the streets of the Colonial Brazil. Responsible for integrating women into the urban labor market, they use to sell various kinds of goods on trays, bowls, baskets and grocery stores in busy urban centers of the future of Brazil.     

Turbante-se Against Cancer

Believing in the power of beauty and aiming to offer a path for women undergoing cancer treatment to find their strength again, reclaiming vanity and confronting the mirror in a positive way, through the month of October, oncology patients have free entry to turban workshops that we offer in a number of locations. Institutions like Hospital Aristides Maltez and Cican in Salvador have so far participated in this action.

Africa Day Ireland

 PHOTOS: CRISTIANESCHMIDT.COM.BR

PHOTOS: CRISTIANESCHMIDT.COM.BR

TurbanVan

 PHOTOS: LEVISUAL.IE

PHOTOS: LEVISUAL.IE

Various